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What I'm Reading What books did everyone get for Yuletide/Christmas/Whatever midwinter festival you celebrate?

Your book reviews, please!

RK Capps

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None for me :( I wasn't allowed this year. But my daughter got The Mistborn Trilogy, The Lunar Chronicles, Daughter of Smoke and Bone trilogy (twice), Red Queen, From Blood and Ash, and an anime. How about you?
 

Josephine

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A Branch From the Lightning Tree, by Martin Shaw, the first of his Mythteller trilogy (non fiction). He is so good and nourishing, especially, somehow, in midwinter (I got his Courting The Wild Twin last Christmas; also highly recommended). He's writing about myth, the outer wildness of the world and our own innate wildness. It's the sort of book where you read a chunk and then have to go and digest it quietly before you can read on. Lovely image-rich poetic style, always kind of nudging at something deeper than the words themselves.
 

RG Worsey

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A Branch From the Lightning Tree, by Martin Shaw, the first of his Mythteller trilogy (non fiction). He is so good and nourishing, especially, somehow, in midwinter (I got his Courting The Wild Twin last Christmas; also highly recommended). He's writing about myth, the outer wildness of the world and our own innate wildness. It's the sort of book where you read a chunk and then have to go and digest it quietly before you can read on. Lovely image-rich poetic style, always kind of nudging at something deeper than the words themselves.
Sounds like something I would love, I will check him out.
 

Hannah F

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A Branch From the Lightning Tree, by Martin Shaw, the first of his Mythteller trilogy (non fiction). He is so good and nourishing, especially, somehow, in midwinter (I got his Courting The Wild Twin last Christmas; also highly recommended). He's writing about myth, the outer wildness of the world and our own innate wildness. It's the sort of book where you read a chunk and then have to go and digest it quietly before you can read on. Lovely image-rich poetic style, always kind of nudging at something deeper than the words themselves.
Sounds good!
 

Andy D

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As well as the new Asterix (which I’m saving for now) I got two books shamelessly of classic films that I’m now reading at the same time: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep - which is so far far more cerebral and features a lot more sheep that Blade Runner; and The Princess Bride - which is just hilarious and has the most fantastic narrative device (though I kinda ruined the magic of it a bit by looking it up on Wikipedia).
 

Robinne Weiss

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As well as the new Asterix (which I’m saving for now) I got two books shamelessly of classic films that I’m now reading at the same time: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep - which is so far far more cerebral and features a lot more sheep that Blade Runner; and The Princess Bride - which is just hilarious and has the most fantastic narrative device (though I kinda ruined the magic of it a bit by looking it up on Wikipedia).
Oh, I love the book The Princess Bride!

I got A Short History of the World According to Sheep by Sally Coulthard. It's a light, easy read. As someone who spins, knits, weaves, and sews wool; and who until recently kept dairy and angora goats, the cultural stuff around fibre and dairy production is quite interesting to me. It is a bit amusing how she obviously views New Zealand as a quaint, sheep-infested nation of competitive shearers (and her statistics on sheep vs human numbers here are out of date), but it's an entertaining read.
 

RG Worsey

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As well as the new Asterix (which I’m saving for now) I got two books shamelessly of classic films that I’m now reading at the same time: Do Androids Dream of Electric Sheep - which is so far far more cerebral and features a lot more sheep that Blade Runner; and The Princess Bride - which is just hilarious and has the most fantastic narrative device (though I kinda ruined the magic of it a bit by looking it up on Wikipedia).
I read Electric Sheep before I saw Blade Runner, and was baffled by the film. No sheep! Odd ending.
 

RG Worsey

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I got books on growing microgreens and making falafels, plus:

Spicebox by Grace Regan (I had mentioned to a friend that I want to expand my curry expertise. This book looks good, as I ate at the author's restaurant in Walthamstow two years ago and loved it.)

High Magick by Damien Echols (I was intrigued by episode 3 of The Midnight Gospel, which featured excerpts from a podcast, with Damien talking about how practicing chaos magick in prison sustained him through a prison sentence on death row, for a crime that he didn't commit. He struck me as such a strong, inspiring person, that I wanted to know more about him, while renewing an old interest in the practice. My boyfriend found the book and gave it to me.)
 

Galadriel

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A Branch From the Lightning Tree, by Martin Shaw, the first of his Mythteller trilogy (non fiction). He is so good and nourishing, especially, somehow, in midwinter (I got his Courting The Wild Twin last Christmas; also highly recommended). He's writing about myth, the outer wildness of the world and our own innate wildness. It's the sort of book where you read a chunk and then have to go and digest it quietly before you can read on. Lovely image-rich poetic style, always kind of nudging at something deeper than the words themselves.
I like the sound of this; thanks for the recommendation. :)
 

Josephine

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I like the sound of this; thanks for the recommendation. :)
Am I right you're in Devon? He's a Devon boy himself although this book talks more about Snowdonia. But I think he lived in a tent on Dartmoor for a bit. He does stuff with the Westcountry School of Myth
 
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