Communicating strange ideas to the everyday reader

Taking a test drive

Help Please! Pop-up Help

Status
Not open for further replies.

Nikky Lee

Nikky Lee
Full Member
Jul 27, 2018
New Zealand
Hi everyone,

I recently wrote a blog about the tricks I use to communicate strange and complex ideas when writing. While I've learnt many of these from my experience in business writing, I've also found that they've come in handy for speculative fiction writing too (and in some instances vice versa).

https://www.nikkythewriter.com/blog/communicating-strange-ideas-to-the-everyday-reader

It got me thinking about how other styles or genres of writing can influence fiction writing for the better or worse. When I'm writing fiction, I'm quite conscious of not slipping too much into "business writer" mode (with varying degrees of success). Has anyone had something similar when writing in two very different styles/genres? Have they helped or hindered?
 
Business writing mode helps trim the fat from fiction, in my experience. Powerpoint that plot!
 
I come from a background of heritage interpretation writing, and spent many years writing mostly signage text--225 words max, and less is better if you want people to actually read it. Needless to say, my stories start out quite sparse. I also had any use of interesting vocabulary or creative language beaten out of me by years of writing for committees of middle-managers. Good thing about that background is that I'm good a planning my structure and writing clearly and succinctly. The other stuff can be added in during editing as long as the basics are there.
 
I think this idea extends beyond genres/styles. I worked with a set-design exercise with my game design students, where they are asked to 'tell a story' using only static objects and no emotionally impactful adjectives. It's actually useful for understanding active environments in fiction too.
 
I liked the blog post.

Well... I think passive voice is sometimes preferred when writing something meant to be objective and unemotional. I figure this must be because passive voice doesn't place the responsibility on anyone.
 
Hi everyone,

I recently wrote a blog about the tricks I use to communicate strange and complex ideas when writing. While I've learnt many of these from my experience in business writing, I've also found that they've come in handy for speculative fiction writing too (and in some instances vice versa).

https://www.nikkythewriter.com/blog/communicating-strange-ideas-to-the-everyday-reader

It got me thinking about how other styles or genres of writing can influence fiction writing for the better or worse. When I'm writing fiction, I'm quite conscious of not slipping too much into "business writer" mode (with varying degrees of success). Has anyone had something similar when writing in two very different styles/genres? Have they helped or hindered?
I have been reading through your blog for writing pointers. Thank you so much for your advice!
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Taking a test drive

Help Please! Pop-up Help

Back
Top