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Review Marvel Comics

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Reality Check Not a one trick pony...

BrainPick "Publishing rationale"

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Paul Whybrow

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Useful lessons indeed, especially the first one: Heroes are not inherently interesting. Only dynamic, flawed characters can connect with dynamic, flawed humans.

This is a particular problem in my writing genre of crime, which is populated with dysfunctional addicted and traumatised sleuths, who somehow manage to combat the always more interesting villains that readers love to hate. As the old saying goes, "No one likes a known-it-all," and that includes fictional heroes.
 

Rachel Caldecott

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The Provocative Imagination Behind Comic Books - The Imaginative Conservative

I also have a personal reason to love Marvel which I might have mentioned before. When my brother was terminally ill Stan Lee and the actors of the Marvel Universe rallied behind him and sent selfies and messages of support. (He was a scholar and life long comic book/art fan). Marvel Studios also arranged to give a private showing of Captain America- The Winter Soldier at his home because he couldn't get to the cinema and would have been dead by the time it came out on DVD. It didn't cure him but it did uplift him, and gave us, his family, something to think about other than his suffering.
 
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Reality Check Not a one trick pony...

BrainPick "Publishing rationale"

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