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Thank You & Hugs

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AgentPete

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As several Litopians know, Peggy (my wife & writing partner for a couple of dozen books) took a bad fall a week ago. This is after being the victim of a hit and run incident in Baker St almost exactly three years ago, from which she’s still recovering.

Many Litopians have experienced similar life-changing incidents. Life turns on a dime. There’s life before the incident, and life afterwards.

I just want to express my deep gratitude to everyone who has mucked in over the past few days to help the Colony function. I’ve only been able to offer a “skeleton service”, but others have more than ably filled the gap. Thank you again, and a big virtual hug all round.

Peg was transferred from St Marys Paddington yesterday to rehab (jokes welcome, anything that brings a smile at the moment is good). She basically has to learn how to walk again, and will probably be there for a couple of weeks. She’s been a trooper, is very determined, and will come out the other end stronger. Built back better, in other words.

The accident, for those who are interested, is beyond weird. She fell from about 24 inches, going down three steps to answer the door, holding the hand rail. There was some forward momentum. She came out with car-crash type injuries.

Ambulance and NHS A&E staff beyond wonderful.

:) x p.
 

RG Worsey

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Accidents, eh? I once fractured my foot by tripping over my laces in the street, and was on crutches for weeks. Yet, I've been in a car crash, fallen down holes and got caught up in a forest fire, with barely a bruise.

Anyway, hope all good, by the spring. Not much fun walking around on icy pavements right now, anyway.
 

Katie-Ellen

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As several Litopians know, Peggy (my wife & writing partner for a couple of dozen books) took a bad fall a week ago. This is after being the victim of a hit and run incident in Baker St almost exactly three years ago, from which she’s still recovering.

Many Litopians have experienced similar life-changing incidents. Life turns on a dime. There’s life before the incident, and life afterwards.

I just want to express my deep gratitude to everyone who has mucked in over the past few days to help the Colony function. I’ve only been able to offer a “skeleton service”, but others have more than ably filled the gap. Thank you again, and a big virtual hug all round.

Peg was transferred from St Marys Paddington yesterday to rehab (jokes welcome, anything that brings a smile at the moment is good). She basically has to learn how to walk again, and will probably be there for a couple of weeks. She’s been a trooper, is very determined, and will come out the other end stronger. Built back better, in other words.

The accident, for those who are interested, is beyond weird. She fell from about 24 inches, going down three steps to answer the door, holding the hand rail. There was some forward momentum. She came out with car-crash type injuries.

Ambulance and NHS A&E staff beyond wonderful.

:) x p.


So, so sorry Peter. Please convey my sympathy and best wishes to Peggy. She is a hero. And so are you, but it must be very frightening. 'Forward momentum.' That does sound strange. Too many things really are not funny right now, but as you say, sometimes you just have to laugh or else you'd cry. There are some things indeed, that mean Life is not the same as it was before. We are not the same but Peggy has great inner resources, as do you. I dearly hope she is up and about, walking again very soon. x
 
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Rachel Caldecott

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Sorry, Peter, this is the first I've heard of her 2 x accidents. How terrible. Please send love from me to her.

While everyone is sharing accidents, I have a history of falling down various stairs (metal, wood, and concrete), and as a result, my behind has been some spectacular colours over the years. I've also fallen off a ladder (that nearly killed me) and peeled my skin off on the pavement while attempting to run for a bus. Talking of buses, coming home from a Japanese work party, slightly tipsy on Xmas eve, I fell while trying to jump gazelle-like onto a passing No 3. Clearly, I thought I was one of those cool dudes who could leap onto a moving bus... (I thought wrong). But the best fall (in terms of embarrassment) was on a first date. My date and I were standing at the traffic lights at Trafalgar Square, waiting to cross. I repeat... we were standing! I went from vertical to horizontal in a nanosecond. My date turned to look into my eyes (no doubt lovingly) to find me gone. I was on my derrière on the ground next to him. We never had a second date.

Big hugs back to both of you.
 

RK Capps

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Oh poor Peggy! Youch! That's awful and painful, so sorry to hear :( Please pass on my best wishes for a full recovery and I hope her stay in rehab is much shorter than my year, lol!
 

Hannah F

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Message to Peggy: Relax and let Pete do ALL the cooking and all the collecting mail from the front door this Christmas. :hot-beverage: :christmas-tree:
 

Catherine Le Bars

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Sending healing thoughts to Peggy. It sounds like a dreadful experience for all of you. The body is a strange thing; sometimes it only takes a twist and pressure at the wrong angle to produce catastrophic results. But it also has the most remarkable ability to heal, and it sounds as though Peggy is in very capable hands. Wishing her a quick and full recovery. Hope you have her home soon xx
 

CageSage

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My heart goes out to Peggy and I wish her a strong recovery, a good progress plan (and a Christmas lunch of her wishes hand-fed on a glass plate), and no more sudden stops off any type of height (I broke my back by misstepping on a 3-inch step, so I understand the catastrophic injuries, and wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy - not even a politician).

Get well, Peggy.
 

Barbara

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So sorry to hear this. Sounds too weird.

I find things like this are usually an opportunity to reflect on what 'something' is trying to say to us. - That, ever since a friend kept saying she's so stressed she needs a break, and got it. Two wrists and one foot. She fell over a flower pot. Note to self ask for holidays. But I digress. - What is the higher self (or life or whoever) trying to say? Legs. What do they represent? The spot in life we're currently standing, where we are, where we're going, our direction. They move us through life. (The forward momentum. Too fast? Too slow? Do we limp through life? Is something in life going faster that her legs can keep up.) Legs help carry the burden. What does a break represent. A small step creates a big break. Does she simply need more calcium or check for osteoporosis? What does the aftermath, our reaction to stuff like that say about us or show us? Two big incidents like this in a short space of time; what do they have in common?

Having to learn to walk again sounds like a message to grab a second chance (at childhood?) at life.

But that's enough waffling from me for today.

I wish her a speedy recovery.
 
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Steve C

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Best Wishes to Peggy. Thank God for the NHS eh? My American sister in law once fell down a few steps in the British Museum and ended up with a broken ankle and arm. Without insurance, she had nightmares as to the costs coming her way. FREE! She reckoned $100k back home!!
 

RG Worsey

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Best Wishes to Peggy. Thank God for the NHS eh? My American sister in law once fell down a few steps in the British Museum and ended up with a broken ankle and arm. Without insurance, she had nightmares as to the costs coming her way. FREE! She reckoned $100k back home!!
This is the main reason why I've never been interested in moving to another country. No NHS! It's like breakdown cover... for life.
 

Hannah F

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I saw a guy break his femur once. It was at a trampoline competition (unusual trampoline injury. It's usually tibia/fibula/radius/ulna/ankle/toe/dislocations/neck - dangerous sport). He was jumping high; there was a loud crack then, as he went up and down, his leg wobbled in a definitely abnormal way. Folk rushed to put their hands on the trampoline to help reduce the bounce. Paramedics are always on-hand at trampoline competitions so, once the lad was stationary, they quickly stabilised it and rushed him away. Strangely, he made no noise. Maybe in too much shock or so much pain he couldn't breathe.

Once he had recovered (a good while later), he was back on the trampoline and winning competitions.

Make sure you get a good physio.
 

Galadriel

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So sorry to hear this. Sounds too weird.

I find things like this are usually an opportunity to reflect on what 'something' is trying to say to us. - That, ever since a friend kept saying she's so stressed she needs a break, and got it. Two wrists and one foot. She fell over a flower pot. Note to self ask for holidays. But I digress. - What is the higher self (or life or whoever) trying to say? Legs. What do they represent? The spot in life we're currently standing, where we are, where we're going, our direction. They move us through life. (The forward momentum. Too fast? Too slow? Do we limp through life? Is something in life going faster that her legs can keep up.) Legs help carry the burden. What does a break represent. A small step creates a big break. Does she simply need more calcium or check for osteoporosis? What does the aftermath, our reaction to stuff like that say about us or show us? Two big incidents like this in a short space of time; what do they have in common?

Having to learn to walk again sounds like a message to grab a second chance (at childhood?) at life.

But that's enough waffling from me for today.

I wish her a speedy recovery.
Barbara, you are so right. Great insight :)
 

AgentPete

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So, so sorry Peter. Please convey my sympathy and best wishes to Peggy. She is a hero. And so are you, but it must be very frightening. 'Forward momentum.' That does sound strange. Too many things really are not funny right now, but as you say, sometimes you just have to laugh or else you'd cry. There are some things indeed, that mean Life is not the same as it was before. We are not the same but Peggy has great inner resources, as do you. I dearly hope she is up and about, walking again very soon. x

Thanks so much, Katie, your kind words mean a lot. :)


Sorry, Peter, this is the first I've heard of her 2 x accidents. How terrible. Please send love from me to her.

While everyone is sharing accidents, I have a history of falling down various stairs (metal, wood, and concrete), and as a result, my behind has been some spectacular colours over the years. I've also fallen off a ladder (that nearly killed me) and peeled my skin off on the pavement while attempting to run for a bus. Talking of buses, coming home from a Japanese work party, slightly tipsy on Xmas eve, I fell while trying to jump gazelle-like onto a passing No 3. Clearly, I thought I was one of those cool dudes who could leap onto a moving bus... (I thought wrong). But the best fall (in terms of embarrassment) was on a first date. My date and I were standing at the traffic lights at Trafalgar Square, waiting to cross. I repeat... we were standing! I went from vertical to horizontal in a nanosecond. My date turned to look into my eyes (no doubt lovingly) to find me gone. I was on my derrière on the ground next to him. We never had a second date.

Big hugs back to both of you.

Blimey Rachel, you sound like a professional tumbler!
Tipsy… Sadly, she hadn’t had a drop, mores the pity. Stone cold sober. But I do suspect that the, ah, inebriated may fall somewhat easier than the non-pissed. Body more relaxed, and so on. Martial arts stuff.



Message to Peggy: Relax and let Pete do ALL the cooking and all the collecting mail from the front door this Christmas. :hot-beverage: :christmas-tree:
That is precisely what I’m doing, and it’s all-consuming. Just shocking how much time it takes.


My heart goes out to Peggy and I wish her a strong recovery, a good progress plan (and a Christmas lunch of her wishes hand-fed on a glass plate), and no more sudden stops off any type of height (I broke my back by misstepping on a 3-inch step, so I understand the catastrophic injuries, and wouldn't wish it on my worst enemy - not even a politician).

Get well, Peggy.
Thanks so much, CS.

Broken back from 3 inches? Yes, I can now believe it. First thing you do is to try to estimate the severity of the injuries proportionate to the energy inflicted, and of course it doesn’t make logical sense. Hope you made a full recovery?


So sorry to hear this. Sounds too weird.

I find things like this are usually an opportunity to reflect on what 'something' is trying to say to us. - That, ever since a friend kept saying she's so stressed she needs a break, and got it. Two wrists and one foot. She fell over a flower pot. Note to self ask for holidays. But I digress. - What is the higher self (or life or whoever) trying to say? Legs. What do they represent? The spot in life we're currently standing, where we are, where we're going, our direction. They move us through life. (The forward momentum. Too fast? Too slow? Do we limp through life? Is something in life going faster that her legs can keep up.) Legs help carry the burden. What does a break represent. A small step creates a big break. Does she simply need more calcium or check for osteoporosis? What does the aftermath, our reaction to stuff like that say about us or show us? Two big incidents like this in a short space of time; what do they have in common?

Having to learn to walk again sounds like a message to grab a second chance (at childhood?) at life.

But that's enough waffling from me for today.

I wish her a speedy recovery.
Thanks B, yes I think there’s some wisdom in this. In fact, I think you do have to see the opportunity in disaster, otherwise it sinks you.

I saw a guy break his femur once. It was at a trampoline competition (unusual trampoline injury. It's usually tibia/fibula/radius/ulna/ankle/toe/dislocations/neck - dangerous sport). He was jumping high; there was a loud crack then, as he went up and down, his leg wobbled in a definitely abnormal way. Folk rushed to put their hands on the trampoline to help reduce the bounce. Paramedics are always on-hand at trampoline competitions so, once the lad was stationary, they quickly stabilised it and rushed him away. Strangely, he made no noise. Maybe in too much shock or so much pain he couldn't breathe.

Once he had recovered (a good while later), he was back on the trampoline and winning competitions.

Make sure you get a good physio.
It took about 12 hours in A&E to stabilise things, including a nerve block to quieten the pain (morphine no good at all). Then we had a long wait for a bed to become available before surgery, and I did check out femur damage on the various medical websites… turns out that – unless there are complicating factors – it is the sort of injury that is very recoverable. Takes many (painful) months, but you can get back to “normal”. I read this out to Peg, and she found it immensely encouraging.
 

Geoff N

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This really sucks. I hadn't heard about the hit and run or the fall until now! Sounds like you're both keeping spirits high, and that's great to hear. Fortunately, Peggy has a pretty stand-up-guy to lean on! (all terrible puns intended)
All the best to you over the holidays!
 

AliG

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I'm so sorry that this has happened, Peter. Dreadful for both of you. Any news on her?
 

Vagabond Heart

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Tell Peggy that though I've never met her, I can feel her courage radiating out to here.

My son broke his back a few years ago. And you're right - being drunk does help with how you fall and how you land. The 'rag-doll' effect of the alcohol (he was coming home from a birthday party) meant he landed more loosely. And though he exploded a vertebrae, he required no surgery - just several months in a back-brace he called Amy Spinehouse.
To be fair there is also the point that, if he hadn't been totally off his trolley, he might have noticed the thirty-foot drop on the other side of the wall he thought led to a short cut home, but what can you do?
Once the climbing crew had been called by the paramedics to hoist him back up, and he got to hospital, he was put on morphine. Whilst still totally pissed. Most of the staff on duty that night elbowed each other out of the way to be the ones looking after him as he, apparently, flirted with everyone and everything ("you're a cute looking monitor") and was funny as fuck.
And his first question on coming out of his drug and alcohol-fuelled fog the next day? Not, 'will I walk again?', oh no. It was, 'will I be shorter?'
I despair.
 

RK Capps

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Tell Peggy that though I've never met her, I can feel her courage radiating out to here.

My son broke his back a few years ago. And you're right - being drunk does help with how you fall and how you land. The 'rag-doll' effect of the alcohol (he was coming home from a birthday party) meant he landed more loosely. And though he exploded a vertebrae, he required no surgery - just several months in a back-brace he called Amy Spinehouse.
To be fair there is also the point that, if he hadn't been totally off his trolley, he might have noticed the thirty-foot drop on the other side of the wall he thought led to a short cut home, but what can you do?
Once the climbing crew had been called by the paramedics to hoist him back up, and he got to hospital, he was put on morphine. Whilst still totally pissed. Most of the staff on duty that night elbowed each other out of the way to be the ones looking after him as he, apparently, flirted with everyone and everything ("you're a cute looking monitor") and was funny as fuck.
And his first question on coming out of his drug and alcohol-fuelled fog the next day? Not, 'will I walk again?', oh no. It was, 'will I be shorter?'
I despair.

What a character!
 

Galadriel

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Tell Peggy that though I've never met her, I can feel her courage radiating out to here.

My son broke his back a few years ago. And you're right - being drunk does help with how you fall and how you land. The 'rag-doll' effect of the alcohol (he was coming home from a birthday party) meant he landed more loosely. And though he exploded a vertebrae, he required no surgery - just several months in a back-brace he called Amy Spinehouse.
To be fair there is also the point that, if he hadn't been totally off his trolley, he might have noticed the thirty-foot drop on the other side of the wall he thought led to a short cut home, but what can you do?
Once the climbing crew had been called by the paramedics to hoist him back up, and he got to hospital, he was put on morphine. Whilst still totally pissed. Most of the staff on duty that night elbowed each other out of the way to be the ones looking after him as he, apparently, flirted with everyone and everything ("you're a cute looking monitor") and was funny as fuck.
And his first question on coming out of his drug and alcohol-fuelled fog the next day? Not, 'will I walk again?', oh no. It was, 'will I be shorter?'
I despair.
Vagabond, I can’t help noticing what a brilliant piece of writing this is; great flair with your anecdote! :)
 

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