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We need a rejection bell

J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#1
Like, when you're happy with your service, and everyone cheers.

My iPhone tells me it's been eight weeks, so that's rejection number ten. I've got another agent lined up within that company; I've waited for the first submission to expire, so now it's time to send out agent letter number thirty-four.

Ding. Yay! Bang head against wall. Deep breath. Game face.
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#7
Ding! Rejections eleven and twelve, ladies and gentlemen. Eight weeks and no response. Still have one of those rejection bells in the fridge, Marc?

Now, one place said they would respond in four weeks if they were ever going to, and I got a rejection six weeks later. My father is trying to publish a "quantum physics meets eastern religion explained" book, and got a rejection from a publisher after almost a year and a half. So, just because you haven't heard from them, doesn't mean you won't get a rejection down the road (or acceptance)!
 
W

Writing Saint

Guest
#10
I'm returning to the forum after several years away (formerly MbaleSaint) and it's good to be back. I've just set up my website and, by coincidence, my first blog post was about coping with rejection. I'm on my second book and the rejections are flying in. It may not say anything you haven't heard before but if you fancy a read you can find it here.
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#13
I'm returning to the forum after several years away (formerly MbaleSaint) and it's good to be back. I've just set up my website and, by coincidence, my first blog post was about coping with rejection. I'm on my second book and the rejections are flying in. It may not say anything you haven't heard before but if you fancy a read you can find it here.
Adroitly-blogged, Writing Saint, and welcome home. I liked the Litopian shout-out, and especially liked your first point, about celebrating your rejection. Hence the point of the rejection bell — it's the only way to stay positive, and not to go mad. And you truly have come further than most. I wrote for seventeen years before I tried to publish anything, and the book I'm submitting I sat and 'tweaked' for four years before 'getting around' to it. I use 'air quotes' because I'm sure these excuses sounds familiar to some of you. So when I got some rejections, it truly did feel good.
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#14
I suggest to throw the rejection bell and create a submission one instead. That is a more impressive achievement and it motivates others to keep submitting. It is also the only thing you can control ;)
Impressive, positive, laudable...
But Lex Black's name is Lex Black which sounds like a sci-fi superhero and he uses the word bombastic, so I therefore have to conclude his position is unassailable, and that we do need a... [shaky black and white text swipe] SUBMISSION GONG!
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#20
I'm wondering what I am waiting for when I read how many submissions are being made. Manuscript still not ready i guess.:(

Will it ever be....
I was reading the thread about the competition with over a thousand entries, for a single winner. I know what you mean.
 
#21
Aah..that was the first submission I ever made and only one so far too. It was to a publisher.

I still haven't started to submit to any agents yet - and that is something I am reading here but not feeling a part of the process yet. I guess I am itching to do so but don't want to do so prematurely or am I risk averse....
 
#22
Impressive, positive, laudable...
But Lex Black's name is Lex Black which sounds like a sci-fi superhero and he uses the word bombastic, so I therefore have to conclude his position is unassailable, and that we do need a... [shaky black and white text swipe] SUBMISSION GONG!
I definitely like the submission Gong better! :D
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#23
Aah..that was the first submission I ever made and only one so far too. It was to a publisher.

I still haven't started to submit to any agents yet - and that is something I am reading here but not feeling a part of the process yet. I guess I am itching to do so but don't want to do so prematurely or am I risk averse....
I know what you mean — "Book 1" sat around for four years, before I started looking for an agent, and this is the first one I've tried to publish, myself. You don't even think about publishing until you're ready. When when you're ready, you just know. It isn't based upon anything rational.
 
#24
I just had two weeks with no rejections (of course, no acceptances, either)...it was horrible! The tension built up every day...would there be a rejection in my in-box? Happy to report I had a rejection yesterday, and I'm much more calm today. At least now I can send out another submission (I try to keep my queries out to 10 at a time)
 
#25
I hope you all don't mind me being nosy to those who have submitted but are not getting the response desired...what do you put in your query letter that ensures the MS is at least looked at?

Maybe we should have feedback on our query letters too? Is it too cheeky to ask someone to look at mine please because I think it might be wordy but I've limited it to 3 short paragraphs (excluding the intro and farewell).

One paragraph is a blurb, another about the context of story wrt market and final is about me (relevant bits only).

Am very nervous to send it out so appreciate any opinions. Would it be cheeky to ask @AgentPete to give an opinion on it too?
 
D

David Steele

Guest
#26
I've found this kindle book to be an excellent guide. That said, I can't pretend I've had any success from it, yet.
I'm starting to think dealing with agents is a bit like trying to talk to the cool girls in college. If you're really lucky, one of them might deign to speak to you. As long as nobody else is looking.
 
J

Jason Byrne

Guest
#30
They've also both been known to say "I... don't know what to say to that."

A lot of these places say right out "look, we're probably not going to answer you, but feel free to submit something."

I think it would be worthwhile to critique agent letters, but beyond the basic formula, they have to be specific to you and the particular work you are trying to publish, and I would count myself among the majority whom can only offer a best guess as to what might work.

I haven't been here as long as many, and I know there is a "don't use this forum to submit a query to Redhammer Management" policy, but might it be in good taste to send him a PM and request merely a critique of your agent letter?
 
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